Bacterial vaginosis and antibacterial susceptibility pattern of asymptomatic urinary tract infection in pregnant women at a tertiary care hospital, Visakhaptn, India

  • Appikatla Madhu Bhavana Department of Microbiology, GITAM Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India
  • Pilli Hema Prakash Kumari Department of Microbiology, GITAM Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India
  • Nitin Mohan Department of Microbiology, GITAM Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India
  • Vijayalakshmai Chandrasekhar Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, GITAM Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India
  • Payala Vijayalakshmi Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, GITAM Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India
  • Rongala Venkata Manasa Department of Community Medicine, GITAM Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India
Keywords:
Antibiotic susceptibility pattern; Bacterial vaginosis; Pregnant women; Urinary tract infection

Abstract

Background and Objectives: The association between bacterial vaginosis and urinary tract infection (UTI) in pregnant women is at a greater risk comparatively than patients with bacterial vaginosis or UTI. Bacterial vaginosis and asymptomatic UTI both pose risk for mother and fetus. Early diagnosis and treatment can save the life of both. The present investigation was aimed to find out the magnitude of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women with noticeable bacterial vaginitis attending antenatal outpatient and inpatient of a tertiary care hospital and to identify the organisms causing it.
Materials and Methods: A total of 117 antenatal women from different age and parity groups with different gestational ages were included in the study. The samples were subjected to standard microbiological techniques for identification of microorganisms. While performing Per speculum examination, vaginal secretions were collected from the posterior fornix. Swabs from the posterior fornix were tested for pH using litmus paper. A wet mount and Gram smear was made and examined for the presence of bacteria, polymorphs and clue cells indicating bacterial vaginosis. Amsel’s criteria and Nugent scoring system were applied for diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis. Antibiotic susceptibility of the isolated bacteria was performed using Kirby-Bauer method.
Results: Bacterial vaginosis infection rate (62.3%) was common in the present study followed by asymptomatic UTI (n=60, 51%). It was also observed that asymptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI) with Bacterial vaginosis prevalent rate was 49 (41.8%) in the current study.
Conclusion: Bacterial vaginosis was more common than asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women. It is recommended that antenatal health care facilities should incorporate screening of vaginitis among pregnant women to prevent the complications of pregnancy. And those women with Bacterial vaginosis should be screened for UTI. Proper use of antibiotics should be encouraged, abuse of antibiotics should be in check.

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Published
2020-01-11
How to Cite
1.
Bhavana A, Kumari P, Mohan N, Chandrasekhar V, Vijayalakshmi P, Manasa R. Bacterial vaginosis and antibacterial susceptibility pattern of asymptomatic urinary tract infection in pregnant women at a tertiary care hospital, Visakhaptn, India. Iran J Microbiol. 11(6):488-495.
Section
Original Article(s)