Comparison of microbiome isolated from the conjunctiva, contact lens and lens storage case of symptomatic and asymptomatic contact lens users

  • L. Raksha Department of Microbiology, Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute, Bangalore, Karnataka, India
  • G.B. Shantala Department of Microbiology, Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute, Bangalore, Karnataka, India
  • Nagaraju Gangashettappa Department of Ophthalmology, Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute, Bangalore, Karnataka, India
  • R. Ambica Department of Microbiology, Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute, Bangalore, Karnataka, India
  • Deepa Sinha Department of Microbiology, Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute, Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Keywords: Microbial keratitis; Symptomatic contact lens users; Contact lens associated ocular microbiome; Dryness

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Contact lenses (CLs) are increasingly being used for cosmetic or therapeutic purposes. Lack of compliance and poor hygiene towards lens care is strongly associated with microbial contamination and has been proved to result in eye infections. The present study was done to compare the microbial flora between symptomatic and asymptomatic contact lens users. The study also attempts to analyze the contact lens hygiene practices of CL users.
Materials and Methods: Six samples each were collected from both the eyes, CLs and lens cases of 40 CL users (n=240) divided into two groups based on symptoms present as- asymptomatic CL users and symptomatic CL users. Organisms were identified using standard microbiological techniques.
Results: The proportion GNB obtained in symptomatic CL users was significantly higher when compared to asymptomatic CL users (p-value= <0.003). In 56.2% eyes, the microbial flora of conjunctiva was similar to either the contact lens isolate/storage case. Enterococcal microbial keratitis was seen in one case.
Conclusion: There was significant microbial contamination present in CL users despite compliance to contact lens hygiene practices. There were a significant number of bacteria (p-value <0.001) present which were resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, and cefotaxime in both the groups.

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Published
2019-11-12
How to Cite
1.
Raksha L, Shantala G, Gangashettappa N, Ambica R, Sinha D. Comparison of microbiome isolated from the conjunctiva, contact lens and lens storage case of symptomatic and asymptomatic contact lens users. Iran J Microbiol. 11(5):349-356.
Section
Original Article(s)