Antimicrobial susceptibility of Brucella spp. isolated from Iranian patients during 2016 to 2018

  • Saeed Alamian Department of Brucellosis, Razi Vaccine and Serum Research Institute (RVSRI), Agricultural Research, Education and Extension Organization (AREEO), Karaj, Iran
  • Maryam Dadar Department of Brucellosis, Razi Vaccine and Serum Research Institute (RVSRI), Agricultural Research, Education and Extension Organization (AREEO), Karaj, Iran
  • Afshar Etemadi Department of Brucellosis, Razi Vaccine and Serum Research Institute (RVSRI), Agricultural Research, Education and Extension Organization (AREEO), Karaj, Iran
  • Davoud Afshar Department of Microbiology and Virology, School of Medicine, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences, Zanjan, Iran
  • Mohammad Mehdi Alamian Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tehran Medical Sciences Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran
Keywords: Brucella; Antimicrobial agents; Brucellosis

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Brucellosis is a widespread zoonotic disease with a high prevalence in both animals and humans. The present study was aimed to evaluate the susceptibility of Brucella strains isolated from human clinical specimens against commonly used antimicrobial agents.
Materials and Methods: A total of 360 blood specimens were collected during 2016-2018 and subjected to culture and Brucella spp. identification. The classical biotyping for Brucella isolates was performed according to Alton and coworker's guidelines. Antimicrobials susceptibility test carried out using disk diffusion and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) methods.
Results: In this study, sixty B. melitensis strains were isolated from blood samples (16%) and all them belonged to biovar 1. Majority of the tested antibacterial agents, excepting ampicillin-sulbactam had an effective activity against B. melitensis isolates in E-test (MIC) and disk diffusion method. Moreover, probable resistance to rifampin and ampicillin-sulbactam were observed in 60 (100%), 1 (1.7%), 11 (18.4%) and 2 (3.4%) isolates, respectively.
Conclusion: Our data suggest that the efficacy of commonly used antibiotics for brucellosis treatment should be regularly monitored. In conclusion, appropriate precaution should be exercised in the context of antibiotic administration to prevent future antibiotic resistance.

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Published
2019-11-12
How to Cite
1.
Alamian S, Dadar M, Etemadi A, Afshar D, Alamian MM. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Brucella spp. isolated from Iranian patients during 2016 to 2018. Iran J Microbiol. 11(5):363-367.
Section
Original Article(s)