Cloning and sequencing of the ompL37 gene present in Leptospira interrogans, a surface protein in pathogenic leptospires

  • Elaheh Rezaei Department of Microbiology, Razi Vaccine & Serum Research Institute, Agricultural Research, Education and Extension Organization (AREEO), Karaj, Iran
  • Pejvak Khaki Department of Microbiology, Razi Vaccine & Serum Research Institute, Agricultural Research, Education and Extension Organization (AREEO), Karaj, Iran
  • Soheila Moradi Bidhendi Department of Microbiology, Razi Vaccine & Serum Research Institute, Agricultural Research, Education and Extension Organization (AREEO), Karaj, Iran
  • Mojtaba Noofeli Department of Human Bacterial Vaccines, Razi Vaccine & Serum Research Institute, Agricultural Research, Education and Extension Organization (AREEO), Karaj, Iran
  • Maryam Sadat Soltani Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran
Keywords: Leptospirosis; Molecular cloning; ompL37 gene

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Leptospirosis, an infection caused by pathogenic leptospires, is associated with insufficient sanitation and poverty. Leptospira is transmitted through contact with contaminated urine of reservoir animals. The primary objective of this study was to clone and sequence the ompL37 gene present in local and vaccine serovars.
Materials and Methods: A total of 16 Leptospira interrogans serovars were cultured in EMJH liquid medium. After growing, genomic DNA was extracted using phenol-chloroform method. Primer pair was synthesized to amplify the 996 bp ompL37 sequence. The amplified ompL37 gene was cloned into pTZ57R/T vector. The sequences obtained from this study were compared with an only recorded sequence in the Genbank by the Meg Align software.
Results: PCR products showed an amplified 996bp ompL37 gene product belonging to pathogenic serovars, while no ompL37 products were amplified in non-pathogenic serovars. Sequences comparison tests from 16 native serotypes examined in this study displayed a similarity range of 84% to 99.5% among serovars used. The results showed that two serotypes of L. interrogans including Serjoehardjo (RTCC2810 and RTCC2821) had the highest identity up to 95.5%. Two serovars of L. interrogans including Pomona (RTCC2822) and Icterohaemorrhagiae (RTCC2823) had the lowest identity about 84%.
Conclusion: As the results showed, ompL37, present on the surface of such bacteria, showed a conserved sequence. ompL37, as a key role in cell adhesion and pathogenicity, can be used for designing diagnostic tests and vaccines. Furthermore, sequencing of various sites in ompL37 gene, including binding sites and immunogenic epitopes, can be valuable alternatives for future studies.

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Published
2019-11-12
How to Cite
1.
Rezaei E, Khaki P, Bidhendi S, Noofeli M, Soltani MS. Cloning and sequencing of the ompL37 gene present in Leptospira interrogans, a surface protein in pathogenic leptospires. Iran J Microbiol. 11(5):373-378.
Section
Original Article(s)